Early morning commutes and end-of-the-day trips share one thing in common: The sun is low in the sky, which can make driving difficult. The glare from the sun can even be intensified as the sunlight is reflected off buildings, other vehicles and even the pavement. If there’s mist or fog on the road, the glare can be even worse.

How do you stay safe when the sun is all but obscuring your vision? Here are some tips offered by AAA for drivers:

  • Clean your windshield thoroughly so that you eliminate any extra glare caused by streaking.
  • Make sure that your windshield is free of pitting and cracks, which can also interfere with vision.
  • Don’t put papers on your dashboards or placards in your window, since they can reflect light.
  • Adjust your seat, and make sure your visor is down far enough to protect your eyes.
  • Put your headlights on so that drivers heading in the opposite direction can see you easily.
  • Get a pair of polarized sunglasses (or clip-on lenses) to reduce glare and protect your eyes.
  • When you’re having a rough time with the glare, use the lines on the road to make sure that you’re in your lane.

If you have some leeway in your schedule, pay attention to the direction you’ll be heading and the time of the day before you go. If you can’t pick your travel time, give yourself a few extra minutes so that you won’t be rushed and can give the vehicles on the road plenty of space.

Despite all your efforts, you can’t do much about other drivers — and not everyone is safety-minded like you. If you’re involved in a serious car accident due to another driver’s reckless or foolish behavior, find out how you can hold them responsible for your lost wages, medical bills and more.