Distracted driving can look much like safe driving. For example, some Fayetteville, North Carolina, motorists may daydream behind the wheel. They could be looking straight ahead while their minds wander, which means you will not know they are distracted.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), these are the three main forms of distracted driving.

  • Visual distractions that take your eyes away from roads
  • Manual distractions that require removing one or both hands from the steering wheel
  • Cognitive distractions that take the mind away from the road and safe motor vehicle operations

The example in the first paragraph—daydreaming behind the wheel—is a cognitive distraction. An example of a visual distraction is looking at a smartphone and not the road. A good example of a manual distraction is dropping something and using one or both hands to find the item.

Although it may not always be possible to spot distracted driving, there are some things to look for such as:

  • The driver is holding a device
  • The driver is eating or drinking
  • The driver is engaged with their kids or other passengers
  • The driver appears to be adjusting the radio or a GPS device

Keeping an eye on other motorists can protect you from motor vehicle accidents, but that is not the only reason to pay attention. If you do suffer injuries in a distracted driving vehicle accident, what you saw before, during and after the crash can help you and your attorney prove that negligence led to your harm. This can support any injury compensation you wish to pursue in the wake of your crash.